The Vanguard – Part 3: Mashiko

What problem?

What problem?

It is a frightening concept to mess with success.  The old adage, “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” is alive and well in our modern economy, and the seafood industry is no exception.  Many seafood purveyors, when confronted with pressure to change their ways, can be resistant – especially if they see success and growth in their businesses.  Why change, if the status quo seems just fine?

The fact is, however, that all is not well.  There are a plethora of rocks and growlers lurking in the murky waters of the seafood industry: overfishing, habitat destruction, IUU fleets, and more.  Still, it’s not common that a business owner is able to see all of these obstacles clearly… especially if ones perspective is obscured by the constant back-and-forth of a ringing cash drawer.

Chef Hajime Sato, however, is different.

A tiny revolution

A tiny revolution

Mashiko restaurant has been operating in Seattle for fifteen years, and it is by no means an unsuccessful operation.  Chef Sato has a line out the door nearly every night, and unless you arrive just as the restaurant opens, it’s almost certain that you’ll be waiting for a table.  By all standards and appearances, this is a prospering business.  And frankly, Chef Sato had all this to lose when, in August of 2009, he took his entire business model and turned it upside-down.

Mashiko is the first sushi restaurant in the world that has transitioned from a conventional operation to a sustainable one.  With only minimal help from myself and the other players in the movement, Sato turned his restaurant into a sustainable operation.  He bid good riddance to his bluefin, hamachi, eel, monkfish, and other unsustainable items.  These days, he directs his efforts towards innovation, education, and the identification of local and sustainable options.

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New moves

Moreover, Chef Sato is the first traditionally-trained Japanese sushi chef to embrace the sustainable sushi movement.  In his words, however, he is simply returning to the basic principles that gave rise to sushi over a hundred years ago: utilization of local and seasonal products, reverence for life, and interpretation of the bounty of the oceans in a respectful and reverent manner.

In the last few months, Mashiko has achieved a much greater degree of exposure than ever before.  Interviews with Chef Sato have run on any number of popular food blogs; he received a glowing review of his operation from the Seattle Times and has appeared on the Food Network’s Extreme Cuisine with Jeff Corwin, where he discussed innovation in sushi, local seafood sourcing, and the amazing bounty of Puget Sound.

Through his bravery in challenging the conventional model, his determination to hold ethics and ocean conservation over the maximization of profit, and his contribution to the nascent sustainable sushi movement as well as the overall awareness of the consumer public in the Pacific Northwest, Chef Hajime Sato has brought a new spark to the sustainable sushi movement.

Good to have you on board, buddy.

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3 Comments

bonnie
Jan 14, 2010 at 11:06 pm

Are there any sustainable sushi restaurants in NYC?

5 minutes googling tells you where not to go (no, no, Nobu!) – where to go instead?


 

[...] who opened his own place in West Seattle 15 years ago and who followed Trenor’s suggestion to transform Mashiko from one of 200 sushi parlors in Seattle alone to one of only three “sustainable sushi” [...]


 
Oskar
Nov 24, 2010 at 7:32 am

Wow! I’d like a full depth article about his restaurant!


 

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